Category Archives: Old British Coins

1977 Queen Elizabeth II British Coin Set

Crown Value :- £20

Crown Grade :- MS67

Fifty Pence Value :- £1.75

Fifty Pence Grade :- MS68

Ten Pence Value :- £1.50

Ten Pence Grade :- MS65

Five Pence Value :- £3

Five Pence Grade :- MS70

Two Pence Value :- £2

Two Pence Grade :- Proof

One Pence Value :- £1.75

One Pence Grade :- MS70

Half Penny Value :- £2

Half Penny Grade :- Proof


1967 Queen Elizabeth II British Two Shillings

Value :- £1.75

Grade :- VF35

The British two shilling coin, also known as the florin or “two bob bit” was issued from 1849 until 1967. It was worth one tenth of a pound, or twenty-four old pence. It should not be confused with the medieval gold florin, which was nominally worth six shillings.

In 1968, in the run-up to decimalisation, the two shilling coin was superseded by the decimal ten pence coin, which had the same value and initially the same size and weight. It continued in circulation, alongside the ten pence, until 1993, when the ten pence was reduced in size.

Florins were produced for Queen Elizabeth II each year between 1953 and 1967, with proof coins again produced in 1970. The obverse shows the Mary Gillick head of Queen Elizabeth, inscribed ELIZABETH II DEI GRATIA BRITT OMN REGINA (1953 only) or ELIZABETH II DEI GRATIA REGINA (all other years), while the reverse shows a tudor rose in the centre surrounded by thistles, shamrocks, and leeks, with the inscription FID DEF TWO SHILLINGS date. In accordance with the plan for decimalisation of the currency (120 years after this denomination was first introduced in the first plan to introduce a decimal currency), from 1968 the decimal ten pence coin was introduced of the same size, weight, and metal composition as the florin. Florins (usually dated 1947 or later) remained in circulation until the size of the decimal ten pence was reduced in 1992, and they were finally demonetised in 1993.


1967 Queen Elizabeth British Half Penny

 

Value :- £0.50

Grade :- EF43

The British halfpenny coin was worth 1/480th of a pound sterling. At first in its 700 year history it was made from silver but as the value of the pound declined, the coin was made from base metals. It was finally abandoned in 1969 as part of the process of decimalising the British currency. A halfpenny, colloquially written ha’penny, was pronounced /ˈheɪpəni/ HAY-pə-nee; 1½d was spoken as a penny ha’penny /əˈpɛniˈheɪpni/ or three ha’pence /θriːˈheɪpəns/.[1]

It was long considered that the first halfpenny coins were produced in the reign of King Edward I (1272–1307), with earlier requirements for small change being provided by “cut coinage”; that is, pennies cut into halves or quarters, usually along the cross which formed a prominent part of the reverse of the coin. However, in recent years metal detectors have discovered a few halfpennies of Kings Henry I (1100–1135) and Henry III (1216–1272) – these are extremely rare and very little is known about them; they have all been found in the London area, where they circulated alongside the more common cut coinage, and while it is possible that these coins were patterns or trials, it is clear that they did see circulation. No documentary evidence of these coins is known to exist, and it is possible that there are other coins or issues still to be discovered.


1928 George V British Florin

Value :- £20

Grade :- VF23

The British two shilling coin, also known as the florin or “two bob bit” was issued from 1849 until 1967. It was worth one tenth of a pound, or twenty-four old pence. It should not be confused with the medieval gold florin, which was nominally worth six shillings.

In 1968, in the run-up to decimalisation, the two shilling coin was superseded by the decimal ten pence coin, which had the same value and initially the same size and weight. It continued in circulation, alongside the ten pence, until 1993, when the ten pence was reduced in size.

Florins bearing his left-facing effigy were minted in each year of the reign of King George V (1910–1936) except 1910 and 1934. Whilst the weight and diameter of the coin were unchanged, the metal composition was changed in 1920 from 0.925 silver to 50% silver, 40% copper, 10% nickel, then again in 1922 to 50% silver, 50% copper, and again in 1927 to 50% silver, 40% copper, 5% nickel, 5% zinc. The design of the reverse was similar to Queen Victoria’s Jubilee florin. Until 1926 the inscriptions on the obverse were GEORGIVS V D G BRITT OMN REX F D IND IMP and on the reverse were ONE FLORIN date, while from 1927 the obverse inscriptions were GEORGIVS V DEI GRA BRITT OMN REX and the reverse ones were FID DEF IND IMP date ONE FLORIN.

This is one of my favourite coins in my collection. Little value great coin.


1967 Queen Elizabeth II Half Crown

Value – £2

The half crown was a denomination of British money worth half of a crown, equivalent to two and a half shillings (30 pence; one-eighth of a pound). The half crown was first issued in 1549, in the reign of Edward VI. No half crowns were issued in the reign of Mary, but from the reign of Elizabeth I half crowns were issued in every reign except Edward VIII, until the coins were discontinued in 1967. The half crown was demonetised (ahead of other pre-decimal coins) on 1 January 1970, the year before the United Kingdom adopted decimal currency on Decimal Day.

During the English Interregnum of 1649-1660, a republican half crown was issued, bearing the arms of the Commonwealth of England, despite monarchist associations of the coin’s name. When Oliver Cromwell made himself Lord Protector of England, half crowns were issued bearing his semi-royal portrait.

The half crown did not display its value on the reverse until 1893.


1953 – 1967 British Queen Elizabeth II Sixpence’s

1953 Value – £6

1954 Value – £6

1955 Value – £3

1956 Value – £4

1957 Value – £3

1958 Value – £8

1959 Value – £2

1960 Value – £10

1961 Value – £5

1962 Value – £1.50

1963 Value – £1.50

1964 Value – £1.50

1965 Value – £1

1966 Value – £1

1967 Value – £2

These fifteen Sixpence’s dated 1953 – 1967 were one of the major starts to my coin collection. Before these I had single coins like half crown, florin, corination crown, threepence and my collection lacked foundation. These coins were what kick started my collection this was the start of my collections foundation. Little value but great coins to start with. Over all my collection of Queen Elizabeth II sixpences are worth  £54.50.

The sixpence, known colloquially as the tanner, or half-shilling, was a British pre-decimal coin, worth six (pre-1971) pence, or 1/40th of a pound sterling.

In England, the first sixpences were struck in the reign of Edward VI in 1551 and continued until they were rendered obsolete by decimalisation in 1971. Along with the shilling (12 pence) and the florin (2 shillings), the last general issue sixpence was issued in 1967 and a special proof version struck for inclusion in the farewell proof set of 1970. However, sixpences, shillings and florins continued to be legal tender at values of 2½, 5 and 10 new pence respectively.

Sixpences were originally supposed to be demonetized upon decimalisation in 1971. However, they remained legal tender until 30 June 1980.


1946, 1948, 1954, 1962 Shillings

1946 Value – £8

1948 Value – £7

1954 Value – £6

1962 Value – £3

These coins were the start of my collection of coins. I gained the 1954 from my step father and I ordered the 1946 off the internet. The 1954 is made up of mostly nickle which lowers it’s value however the 1946 has more silver than the 1954 as it was only in 1947 that the shillings were changed to mostly nickle. The rest of them I gained after.

The shilling is a unit of currency used in some current and former British Commonwealth countries. The word shilling comes from scilling, an accounting term that dates back to Anglo-Saxon times where it was deemed to be the value of a cow in Kent or a sheep elsewhere. The word is thought to derive from the base skell-, “to ring/resound” and the diminutive suffix -ing.  The slang term for a shilling as a currency unit was “bob.”

The abbreviation for shilling is s, from the Latin solidus, the name of a Roman coin. Often it was informally represented by a slash, standing for a long s: e.g., “1/6d” would be 1 shilling and sixpence, or 18d. (often pronounced “one and six”); a price with no pence would be written with a slash and a dash, e.g., “11/–”. Quite often a triangle or (serif) apostrophe would be used to give a more neat appearance, e.g., “1’6″ and “11′-“. In Africa it is often abbreviated sh.

During the Great Recoinage of 1816, the mint was instructed to coin one troy pound (weighing 5760 grains) of standard (0.925 fine) silver into 66 shillings, or its equivalent in other denominations. This effectively set the weight of the shilling, and its subsequent decimal replacement 5 new pence coin, at 87.2727 grains or 5.655 grams from 1816 to 1990, when a new smaller 5p coin was introduced.


1917 Georgivs V 3 Pence

Value – £12.00

This 1917 Three Pence coin is one of many great coins to have in a collection. This was my very first coin of value. Although this coin is not of much value it is still a nice coin for any collection. This coin that I have is valued at about £12. This coin is one of the newer coins compared to some of the others before it. However it does seem old when you look at victorian pennys. I remember when I first looked at this coin and found out that to the date then it was 94 years old. A little bit of history right there.

The threepence or thrupenny bit was a denomination of currency used by various jurisdictions in England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales, until decimalisation of the pound sterling and Irish pound in 1971. It was also used in some parts of the British Empire (later known as the Commonwealth), notably Australia, New Zealand and South Africa.

Before decimalisation brought about a new currency with new coinage, the sum of three pence was pronounced variously “THROOP-ence” “THREPP-ence” or “THRUPP-ence” reflecting different pronunciations in the various regions of Great Britain. Likewise, the coin was usually referred to in conversation as a “THROOP-nee” “THREPP-nee” or “THRUPP-nee” bit.

The reign of king George V (1910–1936) features several changes to the threepence denomination. As with all British silver coins, the silver content was reduced from sterling (0.925) silver to 50% silver, 40% copper, 10% nickel in 1920, 50% silver, 50% copper in 1922, and 50% silver, 40% copper, 5% nickel, 5% zinc in 1927, while the design of the reverse of the circulating threepence (but not the maundy threepence) was completely changed in 1927 to three oak sprigs with three acorns and a “G” in the centre, and the inscription THREE PENCE date. The inscription on the obverse throughout the reign was GEORGIVS V D G BRITT OMN REX F D IND IMP.


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.